It is Well, the Trail

 1993, August, Grand Teton National Park, on the Death Canyon trail to Static Peak, I came around a bend and saw the first bull moose I had ever seen (up close).  I don’t have a picture of this magnificent beast.  I will, however, remember that he was the biggest animal I have come that close to: the neck, massive; the rack, I estimated was six feet across; dark piercing eyes  exuding a strength that convinced me to turn around … on the trail … and go back around the bend, and decide what to do, next.  Here’s an image I found of a bull elk:  
*Note: one of my favorite blogs, “i didn’t have my glasses on”, and the recent post entitled “Trail” motivated me to write this post:  https://ididnthavemyglasseson.com/2016/05/17/trail/

The trail is a profound place to be.  I have followed paths through wildernesses that have enveloped me with fragrances; pristine colors; the wonder of trees; creeks, boulders … The trail is where I escape concrete, street lamps, and automobiles.  Some examples:

Specimen Mountain Trail, Rocky Mountain National Park;  Rolling Creek Trail, Pike National Forest; Mount Falcon Park trails, Indian Hills; Death Canyon Trail, Grand Teton National Park; Cedar Falls Trail, Petit Jean State Park; and Adam Falls Trail / Mount Craig Trail, Rocky Mountain National Park … for a short list.

Teton Crest Trail, Death Canyon Shelf, Grand Teton National Park

I’ll close with this.  There is a book worth looking into, entitled Last Child In The Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature Deficit Disorder, written by Richard Louv.  Second item, I want to acknowledge that I have had some serious “blogger’s block” (like writer’s block).  My continued visits to my favorite blogs have been a part of this “calling” out of my own wildernesses, to finally get a post written again.  Interesting how that works, bloggers helping bloggers.  We all have our trails, and sometimes they are difficult.   

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Maxwell Falls Trailhead, Pike National Forest

 

Trailhead, Adams Falls, Rocky Mountain National Park

 

 

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “It is Well, the Trail

  1. well I know EXACTLY what you mean about the block – I feel like I had it a lot of last fall – and for me – long pauses (like summer breaks – which I need) are the hardest for finding a groove again. and honestly T – I know we all have different reasons for the blocks that come – but I like how you noted what can be a catalyst or kick starter…

    and your note about the trail is potent – and by the way – I have not heard of nature deficit – but it makes sense…. and the book sounds real good.

    lastly, I once saw a comic – super funny…
    had a big ol’ moose outside the tent – right at the entrance,,,,

    the caption said… “The day after hunting season ended…”
    get it?

    Like

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