Robin Williams, and I Hanging Out / Re-write

Robin Williams:

A good man, gifted,

gifting us through prolific imagination,

unleashed humor, amazing spontaneity …

Robin Williams / abc7news.com

 

So much written about R.W.  Thus, Solomon’s piece, at the core of my writing: “It’s all been said before.”

Robin Williams / http://www.calebwilde.com

Here some thoughts of a disc-jockey in “Good Morning, Vietnam”, a professor in “Dead Poets Society”, Mrs.Doubtfire, Teddy Roosevelt in “Night at the Museum”, Ramon the penguin in “Happy Feet”, Maxwell “Wizard” Wallace in “August Rush” … Those are a few parts of Robin Williams.

Robin Williams / http://www.aintitcool.com
Robin Williams / http://www.westlord.com

And here are a few parts of who I was, and how I was blessed, and impacted, by Robin Williams, and his art.   I was the class comedian, high school; a joke for anyone and everyone.  The rush of making people laugh was amazing.  I studied the great comedians: Robin Williams, Bill Cosby, George Carlin, Jerry Seinfield, Steve Martin.   Out of these mentioned, and those I have not mentioned, Robin Williams was … at times … present: where I was, what I was doing.  I read a magazine interview with Robin Williams, and among the many things I read I remember something that wasn’t so cool.  I paraphrase: Williams said that at times, when he was not doing well, he had to go somewhere by himself.

I was blown away by his prolific spontaneity linked up with priceless humor.  I also couldn’t shake the idea that there was a dichotomy happening: humor / laughter with melancholy / depression.  The mixture of these two forces haunted me a bit … and it was because I wanted my depression that I had struggled with since I was a child to be separate from everyone.    I wanted to go to Robin Williams for robust laughter, and I did not want to know that the man who made me laugh struggled with depression like I did.  Incidentally, I didn’t know, when I was a child, that it was depression.  I didn’t learn that it was depression until I was in graduate school (my late thirties) … Sounds crazy.  Robin Williams, to a large degree helped me to release some of my “crazy”, and to be able to sit with all of this, and to laugh through this.

If I could have a discussion with R.W., it might include some of these comments  …

“Bro, just to make this clear, suicide, yes, I agree, is wrong.
Just as important, please know that there is no is condemnation coming from me, nor from my God.  And, I’ve got no judgment for you.
My heart goes out to your family. I can only imagine that their pain is immeasurable.  And its been said that there is no pain up in Heaven.  But, I know your heart is good, Bro; and surely you feel some of their pain … But, I don’t know, because I don’t know much about Heaven.  And by the way, I hope there are people making you laugh … I’m sure there was pressure, through most of your days, to make people laugh.  I know that there are no excuses for ending your life; but there are definitely factors that contributed to your decisions.  Our pain, our struggles, our failures, our shame, we are driven passionately away from all of that … toward something that relieves our suffering.  And the relief is always temporary.  When the performance is over, the Black Dog, depression, remains.”

Robin Williams messed up when he took his own life.  I should have permission to tell my close friends  when / if they messed up.  And my closest friends have permission to tell me when / if I messed up.  We can do that without condemnation.  Do I condemn Robin Williams for taking his life? NO.  Am I angry with Williams?  NO, not so much angry, but sad.  So, maybe the takeaway is this.  We all need to “do” self-care.  We need to take care of ourselves; and in turn, we can bless our families.  If we are wounded, and we are not doing our own work, then how can we be our best with those we love?

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Robin Williams, and I Hanging Out / Re-write

  1. Hi T – I loved your post and actually want to come back and read it again – I am winding down and so I need to go – but you raise many cool points. and the thing that bothers me is a little extraneous – but I hate the medical care for some of the so called irreversible diseases – because many times there are alternative ways to heal from chronic illness – but many of the palliative prescriptions offer people NO hope – and they keep people sick – and slowly deteriorating away – and so I wish that RW would have found somebody who knew some non mainstream getting well options – they may not have worked for him, especially if his diseases had progressed much – but it is pretty sad sometimes to be told that some diseases are not reversible or that they can;t be healed – it can take a lot of work – but many “conditions” can be reversed – anyhow, I just wish RW had encountered someone with an alternative to explore – because instead I think all that modern prescriptions had to offer him was slowly deteriorating with increasing symptoms –

    okay, I am done ranting – I really enjoyed the way you wrote about this truly special and wonderful man.
    🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s